The Best Kitchen Sinks For Your Tiny House

When constructing your own tiny home, there are so many details you have to be conscious of. Space is limited, and interior real estate is something you truly have to strategize. It’s no longer sufficient to just stop by your local department store and pick up the appliances you need. When you’re building a tiny home, you have to think through every space-saving detail, particularly when it comes to large ticket items like your sink.

Your sink is an integral part of your home, no matter the size. It’s where you wash your hands, prepare food, get water supply, and a myriad of other tasks. It is important that your sink is, beyond anything else, functional. Your time in a tiny home will be limited if you aren’t able to at least somewhat comfortably survive in there, and that’s something you have to keep in mind during the entire construction process.

When it comes to a tiny house kitchen sink, there are many different options on the market, as well as some you’ll want to be sure to avoid. Here’s a breakdown of how to choose the right one.

Do tiny house kitchen sinks differ from regular kitchen sinks?

To put it shortly, yes. When you’re choosing a tiny house kitchen sink, you have a much smaller space to work with than a traditional kitchen sink. You also have to take into account water lines, and whether or not you will have them. If so, that will require an additional layer of the construction, whereas not having running water in your tiny home takes “off-grid” living to another level.

What you’re looking for is the following:

  • A sink that’s small enough to fit into your kitchen space.
  • A sink that’s still large enough to complete basic tasks.
  • A sink that does not require complicated installation (such as a drop-in, or farm sink)
  • A sink that still meets your style preferences 

What sinks should I avoid?

When choosing your tiny home kitchen sink, you should generally steer clear of apron front, dual-mount, and some undermount sinks. This is because apron front sinks require more space, as do dual-mounts. Undermount sinks will actually require you to place the sink in first and could take up more space underneath, which could otherwise be utilized for storage. 

When considering your tiny house kitchen sink, remember that you want to envision the entire space together. No longer will it suffice to just imagine the style of sink you prefer, you need to take into account space it takes up as a whole, and its functionality as well. 

What types of sinks are good to use?

Generally speaking, many people choose bar and prep sinks for their tiny homes, given their size (typically smaller, or at least available in smaller sizes) as well as their feasibility of withstanding a weak countertop. Drop-in sinks are your best option for tiny homes, as they are the least complicated to install. 

Bar and prep sinks also offer built-in shelf space on which you can organize things and prepare food. That workspace often comes in handy for a tiny home kitchen.

Our Favorite Tiny House Sinks

Ruvati 15 x 15 inch Drop-in Topmount Bar Prep Sink 16 Gauge Stainless Steel Single Bowl - RVH8115

This Ruvati sink from the Tirana series is perfect for your wet bar or as a secondary prep sink in your kitchen. The sink features a 1-inch wide and 1/4-inch high rim all around that sits topmount on your countertop.

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This single basin bar and prep sink is square, which means that it won’t take up too much space on your countertop, but still deep enough to give you adequate space to work. The rear drain increases workspace in the sink and allows for more storage space underneath the sink, which is crucial for a tiny home. In addition, the compact basin has a sound-absorption system that significantly reduces disposal and dishwashing noise, which can prove essential for small living spaces. 

TORVA 14 x 18 Inch Undermount Kitchen Sink, 16 Gauge T-304 Stainless Steel Single Bowl Wet Bar or Prep Sink with Zero-Radius Corners

TORVA 14" x 18" stainless steel single bowl kitchen sink offers professional style with easy to clean curved corners.

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This undermount sink is coated in a soundproof pad and comes with a sliding colander and a set of sponges. This is a sink that you can discreetly add to any tiny home design, and the stainless steel build will ensure that it lasts as long as possible.

KRAUS KHU101-23-1610-53SS Set with Standart PRO Stainless Steel Sink and Bolden Commercial Pull Faucet Kitchen Sink & Faucet Combo, 23 Inch

This KRAUS Kitchen Combo makes it easy to build the high-end kitchen of your dreams. Upgrade to modern kitchen style with a best-selling Standard PRO Series sink, paired with a sleek Bolden commercial pull-down faucet for maximum visual impact.

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This single basin drop in prep sink is a great mix of functional and yet still stylish. The stainless steel finish also offers a Super Silencer pad, a two-inch diameter drain, and a faucet with various finishes to choose from. Though some may prefer a drop in as it saves a few inches on the countertop (and every inch counts in a tiny home) this sink is one that can certainly get the job done.

Sinkology SK494-24FC-AMZ Wilcox II Farmhouse 24 in. Single Bowl Fireclay Kitchen Sink, Crisp White

The Wilcox II 24 in. single bowl fireclay kitchen sink brings Sinkology’s INSPIRED collection of fireclay sinks to your space. This handcrafted farmhouse sink offers the beauty and durability of Sinkology Fireclay sinks in a compact design, making it a stunning solution for your home’s small kitchen, prep area, laundry room, or tiny-living kitchen.

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This square, single basin option has a white, almost farm sink like quality to it, which makes it the perfect aesthetic addition to your tiny home kitchen, particularly next to your countertop material of choice. It is environmentally friendly, lead-free, and can be recycled. However, it is recommended that your countertops are built around this sink and not the other way around.

About the author
January Nelson is a writer, editor, and dreamer. She writes about astrology, games, love, relationships, and entertainment. January graduated with an English and Literature degree from Columbia University. Read more articles from January on Thought Catalog.

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