13 Men React To The Idea Of Giving Their Kids Their Wife’s Last Name

Twenty20, tarcanden
Twenty20, tarcanden

1. “You might as well rip my testicles off and feed them to the chickens out back. No thanks.”

— Jim, 32

beetlejuice

2. “We had a deal, my wife and I, when our little girl was born: Whoever the baby looked like more would get final naming rights. But that was an issue of the baby’s first name. There was never any doubt that her last name would be mine because that’s the way it has—and probably always will—work. It’s not a sexist thing. It’s a longstanding tradition.”

— Trevor, 29

beetlejuice

3. “As a society, we fail women in so many ways. Giving my wife the option to name our future children after her family seems like the least I could do as a man to atone. I honestly have no problem with it. In fact, I’m going to propose it to my wife later today.”

— Keith, 27

beetlejuice

4. “There’s a guy at work who gave his son his wife’s last name. He can’t live it down. Even the other women at the office give him shit about it, and I’m guessing the kid’s classmates do too. Seems unfair to put a child in that position—to be some kind of outlet for his or her parents’ political agenda.”

— Barry, 30

beetlejuice

5. “My wife took my name, so obviously our kids will too. I married a traditional woman partly so I wouldn’t have to think about these things. My advice to everyone out there is to make sure your values are aligned as a couple before you tie the knot.”

— Nicholas, 30

beetlejuice

6. “I would hope that if you’re having a kid with someone, you respect that person enough to consider going with their name.”

— Panos, 25

beetlejuice

7. “I’m in a long-term relationship and we’re planning on having kids, but we’re not planning on getting married. So the question of names is something we’ve talked about. She wants to take my name, even without being legally wed, just so we can all have the same last name. I think there’s beauty in a family that’s unified by the man’s name.”

— Paul, 27

beetlejuice

8. “Two words: deal breaker. I’ll have to add this to the list of questions I ask before I ever bother proposing to a woman.”

— Mark, 22

beetlejuice

9. “My fiancée recently suggested that we take each other’s last names as our middle names. That makes sense to me. When it comes to our children, it’s trickier. I really want the same last name as my kids—probably because I’ve been conditioned to expect that—but it’s what I honestly want in my heart.”

— Fabrizio, 28

beetlejuice

10. “I understand, in theory, that a woman is just as important—if not more—to the childrearing process than a man is. And yet, if we don’t all adhere to some kind of customary naming practices, there won’t be any continuity throughout family lineages. How will we even be able to keep track of who’s who on a family tree?”

— Simon, 28

beetlejuice

11. “Now that you mention it, I’m surprised I haven’t heard about any women in my wider circle making the last name demand. It’s a reasonable idea, I guess, but I don’t see it becoming common outside of New York City and LA. The flyover states will never get there.”

— Darren, 35

beetlejuice

12. “My two kids have my last name, and we didn’t even think to consider the alternative. There are so many more important things to worry about when you become a new parent. I’d like to think I’m open-minded enough to accept my wife’s last name, but if those birth certificates weren’t already officially signed, maybe I’d feel differently.”

— Victor, 33

beetlejuice

13. “I’m in a hyphenated last name relationship and my wife’s surname is listed first—for the two of us, and our three girls. Once I saw what she had to go through during pregnancy and birth, I think I would’ve agreed to give our babies whatever name she wanted. Luckily, we both agreed on hyphenating.”

— Geoff, 31 TC mark

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  • http://carolec55.wordpress.com caroleparkes

    I’ve been into family history for many years and there is an old tradition of naming the baby’s 2nd name with the mother’s surname. Not hyphenated or anything, just as it is, followed by the husband’s surname. This has been a tremendous help when researching long gone family. I’d love to see this tradition return.

  • elizabeth

    I’m just going to leave this here: “Children don’t ruin women’s careers — husbands do, Harvard study finds” http://news.nationalpost.com/news/world/children-dont-ruin-womens-careers-husbands-do-harvard-study-finds

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