What Each Myers-Briggs Type Does When They’re Sick

We all deal with small-scale colds and flus a little differently. Here’s how every Myers-Briggs type copes when they’re feeling under the weather.
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marisa.zupan

INFJ – Avoids medication unless they absolutely HAVE to take it, but stays home to rest and recoup. No way are they going to let others see them in a vulnerable state!

ENFP – Refuses to rest or relax – disbelieving that this will help them get better – and goes about their day as usual, getting everyone they encounter sick in the process.

ENFJ – Maintains their commitments with a sunny face – not wanting to burden other people with their sickness – and then goes home and crashes hard.

ESFP – Texts all their friends that they’re DYING, who wants to come over for a movie night?

INFP – Stays home and fantasizes (in a totally non-morbid way, of course) about all the nice things people would say about them at their funeral.

ISFJ – Tries to convince everyone that they’re fine, really, they don’t need any help… while secretly wishing that one of their loved ones would ignore their pleas and come take care of them.

ISFP – Secretly revels in having a socially acceptable excuse to stay home and do their own thing for a week or so.

ESFJ – Tries to get better as quickly as possible so that they can take care of any friends or loved ones who have also caught their bug.

ESTJ – Works fervently from bed on their laptop while internally scolding their immune system for not trying harder.

ISTJ – Sticks determinately to whatever methods of getting better they were taught as a child, because that’s what has always worked for them, so why switch it up?

ISTP – Takes enough medication to get a little high and then relishes in the excuse to stay home and play video games.

ESTP – Pops some drugs, chugs an energy drink and goes about their business as usual. If it’s not terminal, what’s there to complain about?

INTP – Googles ten thousand variations of what they might have and ends up in the depths of Wikipedia, learning about a strange Polynesian virus that died out 1000 years ago.

INTJ – Pops some drugs, ignores their sickness and grows steadily more annoyed each time someone asks them how they’re feeling.

ENTJ – Rests for about 30 minutes, decides that’s enough self-care and then gets the hell back to work.

ENTP – Develops a plethora of strange new medicines that they test on themselves, ultimately extending their sickness weeks longer than necessary. TC mark

Heidi Priebe explains how to manage the ups, downs and inside-outs of everyday life as an ENFP in her new book available here.

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This is me letting you go

If there’s one thing we all need to stop doing, it’s waiting around for someone else to show up and change our lives. Just be the person you’ve been waiting for.

At the end of the day, you have two choices in love – one is to accept someone just as they are and the other is to walk away.

We owe it to ourselves to live the greatest life that we’re capable of living, even if that means that we have to be alone for a very long time.

“Everyone could use a book like this at some point in their life.” – Heather

Let go now

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    […] What Each Myers-Briggs Type Does When They’re Sick | Thought Catalog INFP – Stays home and fantasizes (in a totally non-morbid way, of course) about all the nice things people would say about them at their funeral INTP – Googles ten thousand variations of what they might have and ends up in the depths of Wikipedia, learning about a strange Polynesian virus that died out 1000 years ago. These two things are so true. Especially the INTP one   […]

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