8 Fictional Characters That Would Be Great YouTube Stars

YouTube needs some new talent. There are so many untapped abilities in the world of film and television that could be utilized for our own mindless entertainment. The eccentric characters crafted by screenwriters during the 50s, 90s, and late 2000s are comedy gold and, if they were real, I have no doubt that they would be wildly successful YouTube stars.

1. Phoebe Buffay from Friends

Friends
Friends

Rebecca Black’s got nothing on Phoebe Buffay when it comes to making less-than-mediocre songs. Smelly Cat, Love Is Like A Giant Pigeon, Lather Rinse Repeat. These songs would be instant YouTube hits. Plus, the negative commenters would not phase Phoebe because they would be written proof that she was “not being appreciated in her own time,” which is, of course, a good thing.

2. Lucy and Ethel from I Love Lucy

I Love Lucy
I Love Lucy

What could be better than two best friends podcasting about nonsense topics? Nothing. Literally nothing. I’d much rather watch these two describe their disastrous experience at a chocolate factory than listen to another middle school vlogger give me advice about love and dating. Lucy could finally fulfill her desire of being in the spotlight and Ricky could go back to planning shows without her silly interruptions and everything would be perfect.

3. Drunk Liz Lemon

30 Rock
30 Rock

Liz has had her fair share of fame in her time at TBS, but with her mini-TV show, Dealbreaker, turning into a flop as well as her book deal, it seems only natural that she’d want to explore other avenues. With a bottle of wine in hand and a list of complaints, Liz Lemon would make a good online vlogger (read: complainer). Unfortunately, the alcohol would go to her head and instead of drunk dialing Dennis, she’d likely end up ranting to her video camera, uploading it to the Internet, forgetting her password, and discovering that her tear-filled tirade went viral the next morning. Or she’d pass out on the keyboard and go into work with computer-key imprints on her face. If Tina Fey’s real-life success is any indication, Liz Lemon is destined to be a star.

4. Carlton from Prince of Bel-Air

Fresh Prince of Bel Air
Fresh Prince of Bel Air

With a slew of nerdy pick-up lines, Carlton’s attempts at genuine videos would attract viewers simply because of their awkwardness. Meant to be serious, his how-to videos on how to pick up girls would come off as satirical and he’d accrue at least a million views overnight.

5. Jackie from That ‘70s Show

That 70s Show
That 70s Show

As a fashion and beauty guru, Jackie would use YouTube to show off the only thing that matters in life: herself. How her vlogs would likely unfold:

“Hi everyone. I’m going to show you how to look and dress like me. If you want to be me, which you obviously do, you can follow a number of steps. Donna, bring me my makeup set. And put that bag over your face. I don’t want weird people like Eric to be staring at you instead of me. Donna, hurry up! My fans don’t have all day.” Etc.

6. Kramer from Seinfeld

Seinfeld
Seinfeld

Kramer would host a mini-show, probably in Jerry’s apartment without his consent, centered entirely around conspiracy theories or other non-sensical rants about his friends. Like a modern day, male version of Jenna Marbles, Kramer would comment, with brutal honesty, on the lives of everyday people. He might even take a picture of them and show it on camera. He’ll probably get sued at some point. He can’t help it.

7. Reese from Malcolm in the Middle

Malcolm In The Middle
Malcolm In The Middle

Though Reese’s YouTube account would likely start as a way to annoy Malcolm, whose science-based video blogs would get approximately 0 views, it would quickly grow into a platform for documenting his pranks on his brothers. Frances and Hal would probably join in too, until Lois got wind of the situation and forced the boys to make a public apology video, allowing Malcolm to go back to making his science videos in peace.

8. Spock and Captain Kirk from Star Trek (the 2009 version)

Star Trek
Star Trek

Though I’ve never watched the original Star Trek series, the interactions between Captain Kirk and Spock in the 2009 reboot left little to be desired. While their entire YouTube interactions may be composed of Spock correcting everything Kirk says or Kirk retelling his adventurous tales on the USS Enterprise, I’m certain people would tune in to watch their bickering. I know I would. TC mark

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