Thought Catalog

Richard Yates

10 Books For Depressed People

And it’s not just that the characters find themselves in depressing situation after depressing situation (well, they kind of do), it’s the fact that the scope of the novel makes every depressing instance so much more tragic because you’re highly familiar with what lead each character to the sad place they’re in currently.

Charles Bock’s NYT Review Of Richard Yates Seems Angry, Factually Inaccurate

It might seem petty to vocally lambaste Bock’s assertion that ‘the celebrity monikers are presumably screen names’ [re: main characters Haley Joel Osment and Dakota Fanning], but even an amateur blogger or casual internet user should immediately be aware that this is not the case. The last time the phrase ‘screen name’ was relevant was on AOL [circa 1992-1998ish].

Beatniks and the Roots of Hipsters

I think some writers could mention the hipster’s obsession with clothes or music, but every American subculture has an obsession with defining themselves with clothes and music. That is just being American.

Tao Lin: Richard Yates

The novel is not without plot, and indeed it is a great deal more concrete than the plots found in some of the author’s previous work. Stylistically Richard Yates bears more resemblance to Lin’s 2009 novella Shoplifting From American Apparel than it does to his previous novel, Eeeee Eee Eeee (2007).

The Week’s Internet Shit Talking in Review: August 27, 2010

Welcome to a new column on TC—The Week’s Internet Shit Talking in Review. Here, I’ll catalog, analyze and speculate on the small- and large-scale shit talking that’s one of the hallmark phenomena of the internet. Today’s column includes shit talking from the ranks of Facebook, HTMLGIANT, Thought Catalog, Huffington Post, Gawker, Salon.com, 4chan and more.