Thought Catalog

“Moist” And 28 Other Gross-Sounding English Words That Everyone Hates

  • 0

When you poll a group of people on the “most disgusting words,” moist always wins in a landslide, the most-universally hated word in the English language. If you don’t hate that word, say “moist panties” and you will. “Moist” inherently makes the skin crawl because of it’s association both with our genital areas and our favorite desserts. You should not be able to describe that delicious German chocolate cake in the same way you do Nicolas Cage’s private parts. It’s just not part of God’s plan.

For a word to be truly objectionable, it shouldn’t just sound disgusting. The linguistic formula for a disgusting word is to make sure it contains phonetically abrasive letters like “b,” “g,” “m,” “u” and “o,” which you’ll find to be common among the most hated, but “bogus” doesn’t elicit the same response as “bulbous,” the sound of which makes you instantly queasy. When I took Spanish, “burbuja” (meaning “bubble”) was commonly cited as a favorite word amongst my classmates – because who doesn’t like bubbles?

Instead, to truly offend and revolt, it has to play on our deep-seated semiotic associations with meaning. It’s not just the word, but what it represents to us. When we hear “vomit,” we think not just of its unflattering construction but the very image it signifies. There are exceptions to the rule (“blog,” “lugubrious,” “slacks”), but for the most part, our revulsions come socio-culturally loaded. For further proof: Readers frequently write in that words like “liberal” or “conservative” disgust them, based on which team they bat for.

To compile a master list of the most hated words, I went through reader surveys of words that reportedly gross respondents out, from Slate to the Huffington Post, in order to bring together the worst of the worst. So if you ever want to say the grossest sentence in the English language, say: “While still in my panties, I vomited from my jowls a chunky curd of phlegm that was dripping with roaches, maggots and mucus and gurgled a moist egg yolk while I blogged about it.” I don’t know when that would come up, but there you are.

Readers, what words get under your skin? Sound off in the comments.

1. Moist

2. Blog

3. Lugubrious

4. Yolk

5. Gurgle

5. Phlegm

6. Fetus

7. Curd

8. Smear

9. Squirt

10. Chunky

CLICK TO THE NEXT PAGE…

Powered by Revcontent

Poetry Lovers! 💖

Love a soft person. The ones who are positive, even in the worst of circumstances. Someone whose strength is not in bravado, but in their quiet. Someone who is strong for others because that is what is needed in that moment. Someone who is the moon that soothes instead of the sun that burns. Someone who sees the very best in people even when you think they aren’t worth it. The kind of person who always wants to do the best for those they love.

“I bought this on a whim to read as I was resting for the night, and I do not regret it one bit! Everything about the poetry in this book is amazing, heart breaking, and soul searching. It will lift your spirits on your darkest days. I want to thank the author so much for writing this, as it’s something I will be rereading a lot! Always remember, everything about you is important. You matter.” —McKayla

Click to heal your heart

More From Thought Catalog

“Moist” And 28 Other Gross-Sounding English Words That Everyone Hates is cataloged in , , , , , ,
  • http://robertwilkinson.wordpress.com Blottermonkey

    Reblogged this on AlmostHumor By BlotterMonkey and commented:
    “Moist” truly is my least favorite word.

  • http://jeenagould.wordpress.com jeenagould

    Reblogged this on adventure. love. knowledge..

  • http://setoshino.wordpress.com Setoshino

    Reblogged this on The World Without Us.

  • http://frangipaniprincess.com/2013/09/26/lazy-links/ Lazy Links | Frangipani Princess

    […] just because I read the list and need someone to share in my pain, twenty-nine totally gross sounding English words . [Thought […]

  • http://britishaisles.wordpress.com/2014/01/14/sherlock-series-3/ Sherlock, series 3 | britishaisles

    […] the most villainous person in this episode, despite being the human equivalent of the word ‘moist‘.  I feel like bleaching my skin just thinking about him. But the real shocker in this […]

  • http://thesaltwatertwin.com/2014/01/23/brain-science-and-kerouacs-scroll-can-a-writer-multitask/ Brain Science and Kerouac’s Scroll: Can a Writer Multitask? | the saltwater twin

    […] find the word itself unappealing—like youngster or bland (don’t even get me started on moist). It derives from computer lingo and refers to doing two things simultaneously—such as writing an […]

  • http://www.sandandsteam.net/2014/04/friday-challenge-worst-words/ Friday Challenge: Worst Words | Sand and Steam

    […] Worst Words Ever […]

  • http://kronosim.com/5-poets-on-the-most-beautiful-world-in-the-english-language/ 5 Poets On The Most Beautiful World In The English Language | Kronosim

    […] Certain sounds make English speakers cringe; moist is a classic example. When said aloud, it can elicit not only irritation, but a negative physical reaction called word aversion. Word aversion is different from word rage, which describes a dislike for a word or phrase based on its meaning or context, rather than its sound. Like, literally and partner used in a romantic sense are commonly raged-against words, whereas fester and munch are loathed for their unpleasantness. […]

  • http://www.seeduni.info/?p=3581 5 Poets On The Most Beautiful World In The English Language | Seeduni

    […] Certain sounds make English speakers cringe; moist is a classic example. When said aloud, it can elicit not only irritation, but a negative physical reaction called word aversion. Word aversion is different from word rage, which describes a dislike for a word or phrase based on its meaning or context, rather than its sound. Like, literally and partner used in a romantic sense are commonly raged-against words, whereas fester and munch are loathed for their unpleasantness. […]

  • http://juicy411.com/5-poets-on-the-most-beautiful-world-in-the-english-language/ key3 geo1 | key1, geo1 | key5, geo1

    […] Certain sounds make English speakers cringe; moist is a classic example. When said aloud, it can elicit not only irritation, but a negative physical reaction called word aversion. Word aversion is different from word rage, which describes a dislike for a word or phrase based on its meaning or context, rather than its sound. Like, literally and partner used in a romantic sense are commonly raged-against words, whereas fester and munch are loathed for their unpleasantness. […]

  • http://dailykrunch.com/2014/04/21/5-poets-on-the-most-beautiful-world-in-the-english-language/ Daily Krunch » 5 Poets On The Most Beautiful World In The English Language

    […] Certain sounds make English speakers cringe; moist is a classic example. When said aloud, it can elicit not only irritation, but a negative physical reaction called word aversion. Word aversion is different from word rage, which describes a dislike for a word or phrase based on its meaning or context, rather than its sound. Like, literally and partner used in a romantic sense are commonly raged-against words, whereas fester and munch are loathed for their unpleasantness. […]

  • http://gadzuess.com/5-poets-on-the-most-beautiful-world-in-the-english-language/ 5 Poets On The Most Beautiful World In The English Language | Entertainment News

    […] Certain sounds make English speakers cringe; moist is a classic example. When said aloud, it can elicit not only irritation, but a negative physical reaction called word aversion. Word aversion is different from word rage, which describes a dislike for a word or phrase based on its meaning or context, rather than its sound. Like, literally and partner used in a romantic sense are commonly raged-against words, whereas fester and munch are loathed for their unpleasantness. […]

  • http://altosky.twelve31group.com/5-poets-on-the-most-beautiful-world-in-the-english-language/ 5 Poets On The Most Beautiful World In The English Language - AltoSky - AltoSky

    […] Certain sounds make English speakers cringe; moist is a classic example. When said aloud, it can elicit not only irritation, but a negative physical reaction called word aversion. Word aversion is different from word rage, which describes a dislike for a word or phrase based on its meaning or context, rather than its sound. Like, literally and partner used in a romantic sense are commonly raged-against words, whereas fester and munch are loathed for their unpleasantness. […]

  • http://wereport.djfinal.com/2014/04/21/5-poets-on-the-most-beautiful-world-in-the-english-language/ 5 Poets On The Most Beautiful World In The English Language | We Report

    […] Certain sounds make English speakers cringe; moist is a classic example. When said aloud, it can elicit not only irritation, but a negative physical reaction called word aversion. Word aversion is different from word rage, which describes a dislike for a word or phrase based on its meaning or context, rather than its sound. Like, literally and partner used in a romantic sense are commonly raged-against words, whereas fester and munch are loathed for their unpleasantness. […]

  • http://omahasuntimes.com/2014/04/5-poets-on-the-most-beautiful-world-in-the-english-language/ 5 Poets On The Most Beautiful World In The English Language | Omaha Sun Times

    […] Certain sounds make English speakers cringe; moist is a classic example. When said aloud, it can elicit not only irritation, but a negative physical reaction called word aversion. Word aversion is different from word rage, which describes a dislike for a word or phrase based on its meaning or context, rather than its sound. Like, literally and partner used in a romantic sense are commonly raged-against words, whereas fester and munch are loathed for their unpleasantness. […]

  • http://gadzuess.com/5-poets-on-the-most-beautiful-word-in-the-english-language/ 5 Poets On The Most Beautiful Word In The English Language | Entertainment News

    […] Certain sounds make English speakers cringe; moist is a classic example. When said aloud, it can elicit not only irritation, but a negative physical reaction called word aversion. Word aversion is different from word rage, which describes a dislike for a word or phrase based on its meaning or context, rather than its sound. Like, literally and partner used in a romantic sense are commonly raged-against words, whereas fester and munch are loathed for their unpleasantness. […]

  • http://www.buzzweep.com/5-poets-on-the-most-beautiful-word-in-the-english-language/ 5 Poets On The Most Beautiful Word In The English Language - Buzzweep

    […] Certain sounds make English speakers cringe; moist is a classic example. When said aloud, it can elicit not only irritation, but a negative physical reaction called word aversion. Word aversion is different from word rage, which describes a dislike for a word or phrase based on its meaning or context, rather than its sound. Like, literally and partner used in a romantic sense are commonly raged-against words, whereas fester and munch are loathed for their unpleasantness. […]

  • http://thelifeofnicklevine.wordpress.com bluebass2

    Reblogged this on The Life of Nick Levine and commented:
    “While still in my panties, I vomited from my jowls a chunky curd of phlegm that was dripping with roaches, maggots and mucus and gurgled a moist egg yolk while I blogged about it.”

  • Ms. Red

    Centipedes

  • http://new102.cbslocal.com/2014/06/11/moist-smear-and-more-here-are-the-words-we-hate/ Moist, Smear And MORE – Here Are The Words We HATE « Cleveland's New 102

    […] put together this list of the most gross sounding words EVER and we can’t help but feel yucky after reading some of […]

  • http://adeaddrop.com/moist-and-28-other-gross-sounding-english-words-that-everyone-hates/ “Moist” And 28 Other Gross-Sounding English Words That Everyone Hates | A Dead Drop

    […] “Moist” And 28 Other Gross-Sounding English Words That Everyone Hates | Thought Catalog. […]

  • http://chelseaeatstreats.com/easy-weeknight-baked-crispy-chicken-recipe/ Easy Weeknight Baked Crispy Chicken {Recipe} » Chelsea Eats Treats

    […] creation I came up with was not only flavorful and, dare I say, moist, but it was also really easy to make! […]

  • http://candacewrites.com/favourite-words/ Yes, there is such a thing as favourite words

    […] don’t like moist (seriously, I detest this word), maggots (I’m not alone on either of these, in fact, moist rates a number of times). Oh and penetrate (what about piece, […]

  • http://funnymovies.tk.hostinghood.com/2014/11/awk-words.html Awk-Words | Funny Movies

    […] Thanks to Thought Catalog for providing a list of 28 words:https://thoughtcatalog.com/nico-lang/2… […]

  • http://thesetmenu.wordpress.com/2014/11/24/i-think-im-yearning-japanese/ I Think I’m Yearning Japanese | The Set Menu

    […] offered by Urban Dictionary. Regardless, it’s linguistic proximity to the ever-hated “moist” is discerning. ↩ 2. Say one thing about Lauren, say she’s a stickler […]

blog comments powered by Disqus