Five Really Long Sentences I Have Written About Myself In The Third Person

Also known as “My Love Life in Run-ons.”

1. “It all seems rather silly now, how she took every little thing he ever said and did—every tiny bit of attention he ever paid her—and molded it into a great unspoken love, a bright splendid future filled with road trips and hotel rooms and dinner parties and kids and a sprawling garden and a pet pug and maybe even a bunny.”

2. “As she grew older, she would learn about the deep intricacies of human relationships: the little everyday disappointments, the constant battle between forgiveness and giving up, the many, many shades of grey, the hate that grows and grows at the slightest prodding, and all the compromises you have to make for the people you love and the people who love you.”

3. “More than anything, she believed in the power of proximity, in the magic that happens when you manage to integrate someone slowly and steadily into your daily routine; proximity was exactly what she prayed for with closed eyes and clasped hands every night before she went to bed, because maybe proximity could lead to a future with him.”

4. “She should have met him years ago, when she was much younger—at 20 or 21 or 22, she would have found his recklessness endearing, his carelessness charming, his affection flattering, his adoration in no way strange or undeserved—he would have been exactly the kind of guy she wanted and needed in her life back then.”

5. “Standing alone in front of an ice cream cart on a hot, humid summer day, she thought of the love other people so tragically took for granted, and she wondered if, like her, other people also made bargains with God, grand promises of selflessness and devotion if only He would give them someone to love; she wondered at what point these promises were forgotten, and what the punishment was—she’d like to think there were consequences, because life is always fair in the end, but perhaps there were none and perhaps it isn’t.” TC mark

image – Dragan Babi?

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  • Anonymous

    This article leaves a bitter aftertaste.

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=612928768 Samie Rose

    Meh.

  • c-

    i’d describe this as self-indulgent and not thought-provoking at all. Hardly something I’d expect from a website that claims it’s illuminating and informative.

    • http://diaryofafreakinrican.com Debbie

      It leaves me wondering exactly what she went through, and who the person(s) in question is/are. Perhaps you can’t quite relate to it, and you don’t find it thought provoking. 

    • http://dirtyyoungmen.wordpress.com Maxwell Chance

      Agreed.

      I purpose we change the name of this article to “Five Inconsequential And Poorly Written Sentences That Will Most Likely Not Have Any Impact On Your Life Other Than Giving You Something To Read On Your Phone While Taking A Dump In A Public Restroom.”

  • Guest

    Well, I liked it. Especially the last. Captures that angst well, not many people can capture that essence, let alone in 3rd person. Good on you Marla.

  • Guest

    Well, I liked it. Especially the last. Captures that angst well, not many people can capture that essence, let alone in 3rd person. Good on you Marla.

  • Guest

    Well, I liked it. Especially the last. Captures that angst well, not many people can capture that essence, let alone in 3rd person. Good on you Marla.

  • Anonymous

    You should develop this into a short fiction or something. 

  • Anonymous

    You should develop this into a short fiction or something. 

  • Guest

    The sentences may be longer than the median written English sentence, but Wm. Faulkner, Mal. Lowry, Th. Pynchon, etc., would tell her that they are in no way really long. 

  • Sahar

    i liked this a lot, good one.

  • http://twitter.com/melvinismad Melvin Alvarez

    long and emotionally compelling. Double kill.

  • Amnesiacsiblings

    I went on a pretty acrid harangue when I read this earlier, that resulted in the idea that no one will be the voice of this generation, because everyone thinks they are. Is everyone really living mundane, identical lives? I don’t want sentences that condense the bullshit I already think about when I’m brushing my teeth or some shit, I want to read things that birth new ideas– not that you care much about impressing me, as I am evidently incapable of relating to the mid-twenties anomie of your intended audience.

  • http://twitter.com/astoldbyparas Paras

    relatable.

    and I really like this sentiment: “she’d like to think there were consequences, because life is always fair in the end, but perhaps there were none and perhaps it isn’t.”

  • http://twitter.com/astoldbyparas Paras

    relatable.

    and I really like this sentiment: “she’d like to think there were consequences, because life is always fair in the end, but perhaps there were none and perhaps it isn’t.”

  • Sophia

    I think these were beautiful. And I often do the same thing: a pretty line will come to mind in the third person, and I write it down.

    Lovely. <3

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