9 Sentences That Define Exactly What It Means To Be An Older Sibling

wendeewingfield
wendeewingfield

You are a protector.

No matter your age, or even the age of your younger siblings, you still take on the protector role. You want to stand by them, to defend them, to be their biggest advocate. When they tell you a story about some jerk on the train, you get physically heated. When they call you crying about an ex, you start searching plane tickets to fly home and beat his/her a$$. Even in adulthood, you still find yourself wanting to shelter them from pain and heartbreak, as well as your friends, significant others, or random people you meet. No matter where you are or who you’re with, you always take on that protective, selfless role.

You are incredibly brave.

You were the rule-breaker and path-maker. The one your parents were the strictest on, and the one that paved the way for the younger siblings. Because of your mistakes, rules were enforced or let go. Because of your actions, your parents learned how to be more patient, to listen. You were bold, passionate, and often fearless.

You are naturally giving in nature.

Giving to others comes without a second thought. As an older sibling, you were always (and are still always) scouting for things your family members might need, or the best birthday presents. If you come across something that would be useful for a loved one, you buy it without a second thought. Going above and beyond for the people in your life doesn’t faze you in the slightest.

You have a sound moral compass.

Being an older sibling, you were the one who had to create your life and goals independently. You were the first child, which meant first one playing sports or singing in the choir, first one getting Bs on the report card, or first one winning a community service award. Because you went through everything solo, you had to figure out, for yourself, who you wanted to be. Thus, you have a sound sense of direction and purpose. You know what you believe in, and no one can shake your faith.

You are so very strong.

You navigated your pre-teen and teen years without someone telling you the ‘dos’ and ‘donts’ of middle and high school. You pushed through bullying, through changing of friends, through drama, and through the tumultuous emotions of teen-hood. You also dealt with loss in huge ways, with only your parents to support and try to understand how you were feeling. You’ve gone through so much, but as a result, have become so unbelievably strong.

You are empathetic.

You always took on your siblings’ pain as your own. You took the weight of family burdens upon your shoulders. You care, so incredibly much, about the people in your life and you continually feel the need to support them.

You think well on your feet.

You are an older sibling—one who takes on responsibility in any crisis or worrisome situation. Because of this, you know how to be quick, efficient, and smart. You are able to react to situations with poise, able to put others before yourself, and able to handle anything that is thrown your way with confidence and kindness.

You have the powerful ability to forgive.

Though you can be quick-tempered and hot-headed at times, you are incredibly loving and forgiving. From years of forgiving younger siblings for driving you crazy, you know that people are mistake-prone, and that this is okay. You know the world is imperfect, and thus you have a forgiving heart that never has a problem letting go of pain and grudges.

You know how to love.

Your younger siblings always felt somewhat like your children. You took on the ‘motherly’ role with guiding and supporting them, and thus you know how to love unconditionally. You bless your family, your significant others, everyone around you with a love that is pure and selfless. TC mark

Marisa Donnelly

Marisa is a writer, poet, & editor. She is the author of Somewhere On A Highway, a poetry collection on self-discovery, growth, love, loss and the challenges of becoming.

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