The 10 Colleges That Produce The Most Millionaires

Spear’s, a wealth management magazine for super rich people in which they toast themselves via crystal goblets for having it all, conducted a research survey of where millionaires went to college and what they studied. Did you know that if you want to be a millionaire you’re better off getting a degree in engineering, economics, business, or computer science? I guess you can just throw in the towel, English majors! As if we needed yet another reason for people to devalue/make fun of the humanities.

Here are the 10 colleges that birth the most millionaires. Peep the whole list here to see how much your degree is worth.

1. Harvard University

Muns
Muns

Of course Harvard produces the most millionaires because it is also the school attended the most by millionaires.

2. Harvard Business School

HBS1908
HBS1908

Well Tyra Banks went to Harvard Business School (for like a day), so I guess that pretty much sums it up.

3. Stanford University

Jawed Karim
Jawed Karim

Must be all the tech geniuses!

4. University of California

Gku
Gku

Yeah, but which one though?

5. Columbia University

InSapphoWeTrust
InSapphoWeTrust

Seems about right, although I always associate Columbia with the arts.

6. University of Oxford

Tom Murphy
Tom Murphy

That’s that (ye) olde, Medieval money.

7. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Finlay McWalter
Finlay McWalter

Again with the science and technology. I suppose it makes sense, though — millionaires are supposed to be innovators.

8. New York University

atp_tyreseus
atp_tyreseus

And this one really strikes me as odd, because I definitely associate NYU with all-black wearing artsy hipsters.

9. University of Cambridge

Bob Tubbs
Bob Tubbs

The best of the best.

10. University of Pennsylvania

Bryan Y.W. Shin
Bryan Y.W. Shin

It’s all about the Benjamins (Franklin), baby. TC mark

image – Shutterstock

More From Thought Catalog

Sponsored by Homecoming available now on Amazon Prime Video

The People Bringing You Delicious Dairy

A new Thought Catalog series exploring our connection to each other, our food, and where it comes from.

Meet Alise Sjostrom
blog comments powered by Disqus