7 Reasons Why It’s Okay To Be Antisocial In An Overly Social World

7 Reasons Why It’s Okay To Be Introverted In An Extroverted World
Thomas Griesbeck

A fever has struck our modern lives: the fever of being social. When our ancestors once liked to keep to the select few of their immediate circle, now we have people from all over the world with whom we keep in touch, thanks to technology.

This phenomenon is discussed quite satisfyingly in Susan Cain’s Quiet, the book for introverts who feel misunderstood and extroverts who want to understand their introverted friends.

If the now-added term FOMO in the Oxford dictionary is any indication, it looks like everyone is caught up in this phenomenon. Everyone seems to want to be somewhere, and most of the time, it’s because they want to curate the kind of social profile that’s just like everybody else’s. Otherwise, how are you living your life?

But keeping true to your non-sociable ways can be very beneficial for you. Ultimately, your perceived rareness will be the best contributing factor to preserving your well-being. If you remain unconvinced, then here are some reasons why being antisocial works for you.

1. You develop a sharper understanding of the world.

To quote Cain in her book, “The highly sensitive [introverted] tend to be philosophical or spiritual in their orientation, rather than materialistic or hedonistic. They dislike small talk. They often describe themselves as creative or intuitive.”

While introverts are often perceived as antisocial, such is not always the case. Some introverts can still be sociable, up to a certain degree. However, the description does apply to antisocial people.

Removed from the distractions of other people’s opinions and influences, you get to formulate your own views about various things. While many tend to go with the opinion that’s most touted, you get to quietly have your own convictions.

Cain goes on to say, “Highly sensitive people also process information about their environments–both physical and emotional–unusually deeply. They tend to notice subtleties that others miss–another person’s shift in mood, say, or a lightbulb burning a touch too brightly.” There you go!

2. You will know yourself more.

It’s no easy feat to know oneself. Some people go for years being one person, until they come to realize that they were compromising for too long in exchange for fitting in or having a comfortable lifestyle.

The quiet, antisocial ones always seem to know more about themselves, dazed as they are by the vivid worlds they have in their minds. Because you are so attuned to your rich inner life and passionately pursue your lonesome hobbies, you discover more about yourself and don’t mind being on your own so much.

3. You’ll live your life at your own pace.

It’s such a fast world out there that it seems peace has become a precious commodity. We are bombarded everyday with news, social media updates, gatherings, meetings and many more social obligations, not taking into account how noisy the world has seemingly become.

You, the antisocial, like all introverts, get drained after extended socialization and need to recharge your batteries, so to speak. By being away from the social fray, you get to live life the way you want to, without having to hurry off.

4. You don’t feel the pressure as much.

It’s exhausting to keep up with so many things and people, and the added pressure that they bring. People have their social media personas, which will never tell the whole story of their lives. This is why you see endless lists of achievements, travels, accomplishments, happy events and many more.

The pressure that comes from seeing your peers achieve this and that can have a bad effect on you. Being antisocial and keeping your social media use to the minimal keeps you free from other people’s perceptions of what life ought to be.

5. You can preserve your mental well-being.

Social media can negatively impact your mental health. Those that already have preexisting conditions can have their illness aggravated by extended online use. Triggers can vary from one person to the next.

Plus, let’s not pretend that the online world is exactly a kind place all throughout. Just like in real life, people will have things to say, and they are not always good ones. Online, they have even more power to judge you and hide behind their keyboards to express their own self-serving ideas.

If you’re getting too anxious or tend to hyperventilate just looking at your social profile, then it’s time to cleanse yourself. Mental health should always be taken seriously!

6. You get to cultivate the relationships that truly matter.

At the end of the day, you don’t need those hundreds or thousands of people you call your social media friends. The ones who are with you are the ones who stay by you, regardless of the things you do or do not do.

Antisocial people tend to have a small social circle, and the people that they have are kept very close to their hearts. Don’t seek relationships that are shallow in the end. Keep those that mean the most to you.

7. You get to be you!

It’s okay to go against the social current to keep your peace, especially in the mad rush of the world. Whatever you do in life, never pretend to be something you’re not. So if being antisocial is who you really are, then by all means, wear that trait with all of you.

On a last note, being non-sociable can be linked to mental illness, so if you are having problems on this aspect, then please seek help. Don’t let your uniqueness slip away from you because of a crippling condition that can be done away with. Make sure your antisocial ways are still healthy enough for your well-being.

Now go be your antisocial self. Read your book, write your next literary piece or create your own art, the way only you can. TC mark

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Jorisse Gumanay is a passionate reader of fantasy fiction and the classics. Read more articles from Jorisse on Thought Catalog.