The 7 Best Ted Talks For The Lost Post-Grad

tedtalks
tedtalks

1. Daniel Goldstein: The battle between your present and future self

This talk is for the post-grad who’s been blowing their first pay checks on rooftop margaritas immediately upon receiving them—the PG who’s feeling “Young, Wild And Free.” Goldstein uses Odysseus from Homer’s “The Odyssey” as an example to explain the “two heads” we all have: the present self (the one who needs instant gratification) and then the future self (who desires an easy, peaceful retirement). His advice will help the flailing post-grad reconcile their two selves and hopefully, set themselves up for a better future.

tedtalks
tedtalks

2. Amy Cuddy: Your body language shapes who you are

Cuddy gives us hope that we have control over our awkward and nervous tendencies. Her advice on body language and confidence is perfect for the PG feeling like they’re the only one who hasn’t scored a job yet. Cuddy’s talk reminds us that we can trick ourselves into believing in ourselves before a job interview, date, presentation etc. Stand tall and carry on!

tedtalks
tedtalks

3. Kelly McGonigal: How to make stress your friend

Graduating college is inherently stressful. All of a sudden the pressure of getting a job, keeping your friends around, finding an apartment and much more is upon you. McGonigal reassures us that these feelings can be productive— they can actually be the kick-starter to your new, productive life. You just have to believe (against all common knowledge) that stress is good for you. Does sound tricky…

tedtalks
tedtalks

4. Larry Smith: Why you will fail to have a great career

While this talk may be blunt, Smith hits a PG nerve with this talk. His talk begs the question: Why are we avoiding pursuing our dreams? Why do we settle for just a ‘good’ job but balk at the idea of pursuing our ‘passion’? Fear? Laziness? Low Self-Esteem? Feeling incompetent? Attempting normalcy? Of course, we’ve all felt these things. His talk sheds some light on why you should listen to your heart and not that logical voice in your brain telling you your dreams don’t make any sense.

tedtalks
tedtalks

5. Sarah Lewis: Embrace the near win

Not everything we accomplish will be a masterpiece. Lewis assures us that that’s entirely okay. She argues that ‘Almost-failures’—those times we attempted and didn’t entirely succeed— are to be celebrated. She asks: “What gets us to convert ‘success’ into ‘mastery’? And finds the answer in ‘the try.’

tedtalks
tedtalks

6. Casey Gerald: The gospel of doubt

This talk is for all the post-grads who’s critical thinking skills have left them without a god. For those PGS not sure what to believe in. Gerald speaks humorously about how he lost his belief in god after the apocalypse didn’t happen. For all the scary uncertainty of the future, the doubts about what career you will have, whether or not you’ll make money, have a family, find someone to love, there is comfort in the ‘reach.’ The ‘American Dream’ might not be as stable as we would like to believe but instead, we can find salvation in doubt. This talk will make you re-evaluate capitalism’s idea of “success.”

tedtalks
tedtalks

7. Shonda Rhimes: My year of saying yes to everything

Rhimes explains the a term she’s coined, ‘The Hum’: the almost inexplicable, ecstatic feeling of being a titan writer who loves, loves her job. And then she goes on to describe how she lost it. And then gained it back. Her saga can help all of us who have lost that love of life, career or anything else. She assures us that we’re never too old to just ‘play.’ She reminds us that “work doesn’t work without play.” Thought Catalog Logo Mark

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