Lazy Satanists Ruin Chance At Being Taken Seriously With Ridiculous Christmas Display (Florida)

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via YouTube

After a protracted battle for their religious rights, a Satanic temple succeeded in getting its faith represented at the Florida Capitol building yesterday via diorama. Unfortunately, the diorama was also terrible and could basically have been put together by a 5-year-old with little help from their devil loving parents. Via the Tampa Tribune:

The diorama looks identical to one that was rejected last year by state officials for being “grossly offensive,” nearly causing a First Amendment lawsuit.

A doll meant to represent an angel is suspended by what appears to be fishing line, falling from clouds made of cotton into “flames,” some made of construction paper and others painted on the back of the display.

On either side are Bible passages, including one from the Gospel of Luke with Jesus talking to his disciples: “And he said to them, ‘I saw Satan fall like lightning from heaven.’”

I predict this diorama will in no way lead people into Beelzebub’s welcoming arms. For one thing, cardboard and fishing wire, really? That’s just cheap and people like their religion either fancied up or so simple that dioramas aren’t required.

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via YouTube

 The Satanic Temple refers to itself as a religion but doesn’t subscribe to worshipping the devil.

Instead, the organization “advocates rational inquiry removed from supernaturalism,” its website says, admiring Satan as “symbolic of the Eternal Rebel in opposition to arbitrary authority.”

Sounds like something a moody high schooler would come up with but hey, I’m not judging rational inquiry, just this lame display. The Christian version would have been far more compelling. Have proof.

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via Flickr – Lawrence OP
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via Wikipedia – Satan in Hell

Put a little time into these things, Satanists! You’ve got a lot of history to compete with! TC mark

featured image – Heather B.

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