Divided We Will Fall

Eve Chan
Eve Chan

Today I woke up to grey skies and weeping clouds. Never before has the outside world so closely echoed my internal sentiments.

I feel heartbroken, shattered and defeated. I feel like I lost a family member suddenly and without warning. And I suppose in a way, this election does represent a death of sorts.

Just yesterday I was hopeful and excited for the future. I imagined waking up on November 9th to our first female president. I even brought my three-year-old son to the polls with me so he could witness his mother vote for our first ever female candidate. Inequality is not part of the narrative he is being raised on — I wish I could say the same for all American children.

On my way home from work tonight, I walked past the same polling site we were at yesterday and let tears stream down my cheeks the same way they were pouring down from the sky.

I feel like God is crying with me.

One thing that has become painstakingly clear is that I have been living in a bubble during this entire election cycle. Never in my wildest dreams did I actually believe Trump could win the presidency. And here we are, with a white supremacist as our “leader.”

You see, here in New York City, we take pride in our diversity. We take pride in being accepting, open and kind towards everyone — not just people reflecting our own image.

Here in New York City, we enjoy learning about different cultures and respecting them.

Here in New York City, we enjoy treating people equally.

And even though Senator Clinton won the popular vote, meaning the majority of Americans wanted her to be our next president, there are still tens of millions of people living among us who voted for Trump, ultimately resulting in his presidential win via electoral points.

And I am in mourning. And I need to apologize. And I want to apologize, so here I go:

I want to apologize to every black American living in this country. It must be terrifying to tremble with fear every time you pass a police officer or are discriminated against based on the color of your skin. You matter, and your life is just as valuable as mine. I stand with you.

I am sorry.

I am sorry because I heard you crying but I never saw the complexity of your wounds, not until they were going gangrene.

I want to apologize to every Muslim living in this country. It must be terrifying to tremble with fear every time you walk out in public and openly practice your religion. You matter, and your life is just as valuable as mine. I stand with you.

I am sorry.

I am sorry because I heard you crying but I never saw the complexity of your wounds, not until they were going gangrene.

I want to apologize to every disabled person living in this country. It must be terrifying to tremble with fear every time you are mocked and bullied for living life as life was given to you. You matter, and your life is just as valuable as mine. I stand with you.

I am sorry.

I am sorry because I heard you crying but I never saw the complexity of your wounds, not until they were going gangrene.

I want to apologize to every immigrant living in this country. It must be terrifying to tremble in fear every time you think of having your life stripped away. You matter, and your life is just as valuable as mine. I stand with you.

I am sorry.

I am sorry because I heard you crying but I never saw the complexity of your wounds, not until they were going gangrene.

And to the women of America — I am sorry because I know your struggles. I stand with you. I am you. And I can assure you, we are more than just “pussies” to be grabbed— we are strong, we are intelligent, we are capable and above all we are human.

We are all human.

Why isn’t our humanity the narrative we have been focused on this entire time? Are we not all citizens of this planet aiming for peace, abundance and planetary health?

Today we have to change this. We have to get back to the basics. We have to get back to being kind. To being love. To being true. To being peaceful. To being human.

Everything comes back to you, to me, to us.

And while we may have woken up on November 9th as the Divided States of America, we have to remember, Trump isn’t who we are and he doesn’t represent the majority of us.

Trump plays on hatred, discontent and anger. Let’s play on a different frequency entirely — love, acceptance and kindness.

Trump may be the president, but he doesn’t have to be your leader. He certainly isn’t mine.

Let’s take back our country and our power. It’s time to affect real change; we are Americans and this country was built on immigration, hard-work, hope and dreams— anyone who says differently is misinformed.

It’s time to change the narrative and sew the gaping wounds of this country back together. United we stand, divided we fall. TC mark

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