7 Things You Need to Read In The Wake Of The Zimmerman Verdict

It seems like everyone I know on Facebook and follow on Twitter has been sharing beautifully articulated responses to the anger and frustration that people are feeling after George Zimmerman was found not guilty. Some were written in the hours and days after the verdict, some were written years and even decades ago but capture the situation perfectly. After spending way too much time reading everything I could, here are seven that everyone should read. Please add to this list in the comments.

1. The Zimmerman Jury Told Young Black Men What We Already Knew by Cord Jefferson at Gawker

It is a complicated thing to be young, black, and male in America. Not only are you well aware that many people are afraid of you—you can see them clutching their purses or stiffening in their subway seats when you sit across from them—you must also remain conscious of the fact that people expect you to be apologetic for their fear. It’s your job to be remorseful about the fact that your very nature makes them uncomfortable, like a pilot having to apologize to a fearful flyer for being in the sky…Trayvon Martin is dead—and so many young men like him are dead or in prison—because in America it was his responsibility to take it. It was his responsibility to let a stranger with a gun follow him at night in his own neighborhood and suspect him of wrongdoing. It was his responsibility to apologize for being a black kid who scared people. It was not George Zimmerman’s responsibility to let a boy get home to his family.

2. Questlove: Trayvon Martin and I Ain’t Shit by Questlove at New York Magazine

I’m in scenarios all the time in which primitive, exotic-looking me — six-foot-two, 300 pounds, uncivilized Afro, for starters — finds himself in places where people who look like me aren’t normally found. I mean, what can I do? I have to be somewhere on Earth, correct? In the beginning — let’s say 2002, when the gates of “Hey, Ahmir, would you like to come to [swanky elitist place]?” opened — I’d say “no,” mostly because it’s been hammered in my DNA to not “rock the boat,” which means not making “certain people” feel uncomfortable.

I mean, that is a crazy way to live. Seriously, imagine a life in which you think of other people’s safety and comfort first, before your own. You’re programmed and taught that from the gate. It’s like the opposite of entitlement.

3. A Letter to My Nephew by James Baldwin at The Progressive (1962)

I know what the world has done to my brother and how narrowly he has survived it and I know, which is much worse, and this is the crime of which I accuse my country and my countrymen and for which neither I nor time nor history will ever forgive them, that they have destroyed and are destroying hundreds of thousands of lives and do not know it and do not want to know it. One can be–indeed, one must strive to become–tough and philosophical concerning destruction and death, for this is what most of mankind has been best at since we have heard of war; remember, I said most of mankind, but it is not permissible that the authors of devastation should also be innocent. It is the innocence which constitutes the crime.

4. George Zimmerman, Not Guilty: Blood On The Leaves by Jelani Cobb at The New Yorker

There’s fear that the verdict will embolden vigilantes, but that need not be the concern: history has already done that. You don’t have to recall specifics of everything that has transpired in Florida over the past two hundred years to recognize this. The details of Rosewood, the black town terrorized and burned to the ground in 1923, and of Groveland and the black men falsely accused of rape and murdered there in 1949, can remain obscure and retain sway over our present concerns. Names—like Claude Neal, lynched in 1934, and Harry and Harriette Moore, N.A.A.C.P. organizers in Mims County, killed by a firebomb in 1951—can be overlooked. What cannot be forgotten, however, is that there were no consequences for those actions.

Perhaps history does not repeat itself exactly, but it is certainly prone to extended paraphrases. Long before the jury announced its decision, many people had seen what the outcome would be, had known that it would be a strange echo of the words Zimmerman uttered that rainy night in central Florida: they always get away.

5. All About Love (2001) by bell hooks

White supremacy has taught him that all people of color are threats irrespective of their behavior. Capitalism has taught him that, at all costs, his property can and must be protected. Patriarchy has taught him that his masculinity has to be proved by the willingness to conquer fear through aggression; that it would be unmanly to ask questions before taking action. Mass media then brings us the news of this in a newspeak manner that sounds almost jocular and celebratory, as though no tragedy has happened, as though the sacrifice of a young life was necessary to uphold property values and white patriarchal honor. Viewers are encouraged feel sympathy for the white male home owner who made a mistake. The fact that this mistake led to the violent death of an innocent young man does not register; the narrative is worded in a manner that encourages viewers to identify with the one who made the mistake by doing what we are led to feel we might all do to “protect our property at all costs from any sense of perceived threat.” This is what the worship of death looks like.

6. The Whole System Failed Trayvon Martin by Charles M. Blow at New York Times

So what do I tell my boys now? At what precise pace should a black man walk to avoid suspicion?

And can they ever stop walking away, or running away, and simply stand their ground? Can they become righteously indignant without being fatally wounded?

Is there anyplace safe enough, or any cargo innocent enough, for a black man in this country? Martin was where he was supposed to be — in a gated community — carrying candy and a canned drink.

The whole system failed Martin. What prevents it from failing my children, or yours?

I feel that I must tell my boys that, but I can’t. It’s stuck in my throat. It’s an impossibly heartbreaking conversation to have. So, I sit and watch in silence, and occasionally mouth the word, “breathe,” because I keep forgetting to.

7. On Juror B37 and the Willfully Passive Consumption of White Supremacy by Bree Picower

Choosing to know nothing about sports is a privilege because I don’t see a connection between sports and my daily life. Just as knowing nothing about George Zimmerman and Trayvon Martin was a choice these jurors made because they did not see a connection between this murder and their lives. The painful difference here is that my ignorance is a playful joke among friends, while the ignorance of these jurors was positioned as neutrality and in fact was what made them QUALIFIED to serve as jurors. It is the hallmark of our “post-racial,” “color-blind” society that the willful white ignorance that could make a person so unaware of how race/racism and oppression operates could be framed, in fact, as expertise. This positioning provided the jurors with the power to make decisions over the very things they have no understanding of. But this willful ignorance is of course a fallacy, and while many whites believe they are color-blind, their construction of the world around them is racialized in a myriad of ways. TC mark

More From Thought Catalog

  • Thought Catalog

    Reblogged this on Tigerlily's Garden and commented:
    There is nothing I can add that will add to this. It already says it all.
    ~Kathy

  • Thought Catalog

    Reblogged this on The World Without Us.

  • Thought Catalog

    Reblogged this on Friend in your head….

  • http://marmaladia.org/2013/07/19/fffyb-8/ FFFYB #8 | Marmaladia

    […] On a slightly different note, this is something else that’s important reading: 7 Things You Need to Read In The Wake Of The Zimmerman Verdict. […]

blog comments powered by Disqus